Building Ambition Through Action

Welcome to the Building Ambition Through Action campaign site, a diverse display of innovative and successful programs implementing Natural Climate Solutions in the United States. The programs shown below, supported by government, corporate, and tribal funding, detail their lessons learned and outline a pathway for broader adoption. Immerse yourself in the different media to learn more.

Stories from the field

Click on the map below to explore our different stories:

PATHWAYS
AGRICULTURE FORESTRY WETLANDS & PEATLANDS

Wisconsin

Dairy Feed in Focus

Wisconsin and Michigan farmers working with The Nature Conservancy and corporate partners, are taking the lead in implementing innovative climate-smart agriculture practices on Midwestern dairy farms that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve soil health.

Minnesota

Minnesota Forever Green Initiative

By keeping farmland covered with plants year round, perennial grains like Kernza® and “cash cover crops” like winter camelina can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase soil carbon storage.

Utah

Canyonlands Research Center Biocrust Restoration

Scientists at The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Geological Survey are researching cutting-edge techniques to restore biocrust, the desert’s soil surface, which sequesters CO2 and helps sustain plants, wildlife, and agriculture.

Idaho

Boise City of Trees Challenge

The City of Trees Challenge is an ongoing story of community and collaboration to address climate change, aiming to plant an urban tree for every household in Boise, Idaho and a forest seedling for every resident by 2030, while also ensuring that these trees survive and thrive well into the future.

Indiana

The MANO Project

Historically, the decision-making process in the field of conservation has left minorities and vulnerable communities out of the conversation. The Hispanic Access Foundation’s MANO Project partners with agencies like the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to connect and mentor young leaders of color to protect public lands and implement equitable and just climate change strategies.

Maryland

Family Forest Carbon Program

The Family Forest Carbon Program assists family forest owners, like the Trezise Family in Maryland, who own the largest portion of U.S. forestland, to tackle climate change by capturing and storing more carbon while making money from their land through access to carbon markets.

Oregon

Pacific Northwest Resilient Landscape Initiative - Mt. Ashland Demonstration Forest

Through land purchases and conservation easements that pay private landowners to protect and conserve their land, land trusts play a crucial role in protecting biodiversity and addressing climate change. For example, through its purchase of the 1,120-acre Mount Ashland Forest in Oregon, the Pacific Forest Trust is creating a model for climate-smart forestry on carbon-rich, ecologically valuable land.

Vermont

Burlington, Vermont Nature-Based Climate Solutions Plan

The City of Burlington, Vermont’s science-driven Nature-Based Climate Solution Plan is bringing the whole city together to advance innovative solutions to address climate change.

Washington

Reducing Forest Fuel Loads Through Biochar Conversion

To reduce wildfire risks, this project undertaken by the Lands Council and Kalispel Tribe reduces forest fuels by turning slash piles into biochar, which can be applied to agricultural soils to improve water holding capacity and increase carbon sequestration.

Alabama

Lightning Point Shoreline Restoration Project

Lighting Point is a climate-smart shoreline restoration project with benefits for people and nature. Through coastal wetland restoration and infrastructure improvements, a broad partnership, led by The Nature Conservancy, is making the city of Bayou la Batre, Alabama more resilient to hurricanes, while increasing carbon storage, improving wildlife habitat, and supporting the local fishing economy.

Minnesota

Restoring Minnesota Peatlands

Peatlands are unique waterlogged ecosystems where plant matter builds up without decaying. The Nature Conservancy is spearheading peatland restoration research, while exploring the potential to develop high-quality credits for climate mitigation markets.

N. Carolina

North Carolina Seagrass Inventory & Mapping Program

North Carolina is developing a first-of-its-kind greenhouse gas inventory to support efforts to protect and restore seagrasses by measuring their ability to store carbon, providing a model for other states.

N. Carolina

North Carolina Pocosin Peatland Restoration

Restoring drained peatlands in the Southeastern U.S. could cut carbon emissions by at least 2.66 million metric tons a year, reduce wildfire risk, increase flood resilience, and decrease surface water pollution. To help achieve this, The Nature Conservancy developed a methodology for landowners to generate verified carbon credits by restoring drained peatlands, providing income towards project costs – a win-win solution.

Virginia

Virginia Coast Reserve Seagrass Restoration

In the 1930’s, seagrass disappeared from Virginia’s Eastern Shore, and with it all the benefits it provided—habitat for marine life, erosion control, and atmospheric carbon capture. In the 1990’s, a small patch of seagrass re-appeared, and a partnership led by The Nature Conservancy, has now restored nearly 10,000 acres of seagrass at the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR). Thanks to the success of this program, the VCR is the first place on the planet with a validated and verified seagrass carbon market project.

Wisconsin

Dairy Feed in Focus

Wisconsin and Michigan farmers working with The Nature Conservancy and corporate partners, are taking the lead in implementing innovative climate-smart agriculture practices on Midwestern dairy farms that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve soil health.

Minnesota

Minnesota Forever Green Initiative

By keeping farmland covered with plants year round, perennial grains like Kernza® and “cash cover crops” like winter camelina can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase soil carbon storage.

Utah

Canyonlands Research Center Biocrust Restoration

Scientists at The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Geological Survey are researching cutting-edge techniques to restore biocrust, the desert’s soil surface, which sequesters CO2 and helps sustain plants, wildlife, and agriculture.

Idaho

Boise City of Trees Challenge

The City of Trees Challenge is an ongoing story of community and collaboration to address climate change, aiming to plant an urban tree for every household in Boise, Idaho and a forest seedling for every resident by 2030, while also ensuring that these trees survive and thrive well into the future.

Indiana

The MANO Project

Historically, the decision-making process in the field of conservation has left minorities and vulnerable communities out of the conversation. The Hispanic Access Foundation’s MANO Project partners with agencies like the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to connect and mentor young leaders of color to protect public lands and implement equitable and just climate change strategies.

Maryland

Family Forest Carbon Program

The Family Forest Carbon Program assists family forest owners, like the Trezise Family in Maryland, who own the largest portion of U.S. forestland, to tackle climate change by capturing and storing more carbon while making money from their land through access to carbon markets.

Oregon

Pacific Northwest Resilient Landscape Initiative - Mt. Ashland Demonstration Forest

Through land purchases and conservation easements that pay private landowners to protect and conserve their land, land trusts play a crucial role in protecting biodiversity and addressing climate change. For example, through its purchase of the 1,120-acre Mount Ashland Forest in Oregon, the Pacific Forest Trust is creating a model for climate-smart forestry on carbon-rich, ecologically valuable land.

Vermont

Burlington, Vermont Nature-Based Climate Solutions Plan

The City of Burlington, Vermont’s science-driven Nature-Based Climate Solution Plan is bringing the whole city together to advance innovative solutions to address climate change.

Washington

Reducing Forest Fuel Loads Through Biochar Conversion

To reduce wildfire risks, this project undertaken by the Lands Council and Kalispel Tribe reduces forest fuels by turning slash piles into biochar, which can be applied to agricultural soils to improve water holding capacity and increase carbon sequestration.

Alabama

Lightning Point Shoreline Restoration Project

Lighting Point is a climate-smart shoreline restoration project with benefits for people and nature. Through coastal wetland restoration and infrastructure improvements, a broad partnership, led by The Nature Conservancy, is making the city of Bayou la Batre, Alabama more resilient to hurricanes, while increasing carbon storage, improving wildlife habitat, and supporting the local fishing economy.

Minnesota

Restoring Minnesota Peatlands

Peatlands are unique waterlogged ecosystems where plant matter builds up without decaying. The Nature Conservancy is spearheading peatland restoration research, while exploring the potential to develop high-quality credits for climate mitigation markets.

N. Carolina

North Carolina Seagrass Inventory & Mapping Program

North Carolina is developing a first-of-its-kind greenhouse gas inventory to support efforts to protect and restore seagrasses by measuring their ability to store carbon, providing a model for other states.

N. Carolina

North Carolina Pocosin Peatland Restoration

Restoring drained peatlands in the Southeastern U.S. could cut carbon emissions by at least 2.66 million metric tons a year, reduce wildfire risk, increase flood resilience, and decrease surface water pollution. To help achieve this, The Nature Conservancy developed a methodology for landowners to generate verified carbon credits by restoring drained peatlands, providing income towards project costs – a win-win solution.

Virginia

Virginia Coast Reserve Seagrass Restoration

In the 1930’s, seagrass disappeared from Virginia’s Eastern Shore, and with it all the benefits it provided—habitat for marine life, erosion control, and atmospheric carbon capture. In the 1990’s, a small patch of seagrass re-appeared, and a partnership led by The Nature Conservancy, has now restored nearly 10,000 acres of seagrass at the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR). Thanks to the success of this program, the VCR is the first place on the planet with a validated and verified seagrass carbon market project.

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